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100% Vegetarian Monolaurin

100% Vegetarian Monolaurin
Item #: 4683

Size: 90 Vegetarian Capsules
Single Price: $17.95
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100% Vegetarian Monolaurin, 1,100 mg, 90 Vegetarian Capsules
From Raw Coconut

  • Provides Nutritional Support
  • Boosts Healthy Immune & Digestive System Functions
  • Studied for Its Anti-Viral & Anti-Bacterial Properties
  • Great for Cold & Flu Season

100% Vegetarian Monolaurin capsules are intended to provide nutritional support for healthy immune function and healthy digestive system function. Monolaurin is derived from raw coconut, a natural source of the medium chain triglyceride lauric acid. These completely vegetarian capsules supply 1,100 mg of Monolaurin per serving.

Monolaurin is a glyceride ester derivative of lauric acid, a fatty acid found naturally in breast milk and certain vegetable oils. Lauric acid has been used as a germicidal agent for centuries. It was originally discovered when microbiologists studied human breast milk to determine the antiviral substances it contained which protected infants from microbial infections. In laboratory studies, Monolaurin has repeatedly shown exciting results as an anti-viral and anti-bacterial agent, and as a dietary supplement.

In studies performed at the Respiratory Virology Branch of the Center for Disease Control in Atlanta, Georgia, Monolaurin was found effective against 14 human RNA and DNA enveloped viruses in cell culture. These included influenza, RSV, Rubeola, Newcastle's, Coronavirus, Herpes Simplex types 1 & 2, Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) and cytomegalovirus. Monolaurin removed all measurable infectivity by disintegrating the virus envelope. In addition to antiviral effects, Monolaurin has shown to have antibacterial defenses against Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus agalactiae, Groups A, F & G streptococci, Chlamydia, H. pylori, and against yeast and fungi as well, including Candida and ringworm.

Monolaurin is included on the GRAS (Generally Recognized As Safe) list.

Directions: Use only as directed. Take two vegetarian capsules daily with a meal or as directed by your health care practitioner. Store in a cool, dry place.

Supplement Facts
Servings Size 2 Capsules
Servings Per Container 45
  Amount Per Serving % Daily Value
Calories 5  
  Calories from Fat 2  
Total Carbohydrate <1 g <1%
  Dietary Fiber <1% 1%
Monolaurin 1,100 mg *
† Percent Daily Value based on a 2,000 calorie diet.
*Daily Value not established.

Other Ingredients: Vegetable cellulose capsule, magnesium stearate and silica.

Warning: Keep out of reach of children. Keep your licensed health care practitioner informed when using this product.

Monolaurin References
1. Isaacs CE. The antimicrobial function of milk lipids. Adv. Nutr. Res. 10:271-85, 2001.
2. Welsh JK, May JT. Anti-infective properties of breast milk. J. Pediatrics 94, 1-9, 1979.
3. Hierholzer JC and Kabara JJ. In vitro effects of Monolaurin compounds on enveloped RNA and DNA viruses. J. Food Safety 4:1, 1982.
4. Kabara JJ. Lipids as host-resistance factors of human milk. Nutr. Rev. 38:65, 1980.
5. Silver RK et al. Factors in human milk interfering with influenza-virus activities. Science 123:932-933, 1956.
6. Cohen SS. Strategy for the chemotherapy of infectious diseases. Science 197:431, 1977.
7. Dulbecco A. Interference with viral multi- plication. In: Virology, Dulbecco, A. and Ginsberg, H. edit, Harper & Row, Philadelphia, 1980.
8. Kabara JJ et al. Fatty acids and derivatives as antimicrobial agents. Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 2:23, 1972.
9. Sands JA et al. Antiviral effects of fatty acids and derivatives. In: Pharmacological Effects of Lipids. Am. Oil Chem. Soc: Champaign, 1979;75.
10. Beuchat LA. Comparison of antiviral activities of potassium sorbate, sodium benzoate and glycerol and sucrose esters of fatty acids. Appi. Environ. Microbiol. 39:1178, 1980.
11. Sands J et al. Extreme sensitivity of enveloped viruses, including herpes simplex, to long chain unsaturated monoglycerides and alcohols. Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy 15(1):67-73, 1979.
12. Kohn A. et al. Unsaturated free fatty acids inactivated animal envelope viruses. Arch. Virol. 66:301-306, 1980.
13. Ismail-Cassim, N et al. Inhibition of the uncoating of bovine enterovirus by short chain fatty acids. J. Gen. Virol. 71(10):2283-9, 1990.
14. Rabia S. et al. Inactivation of vesicular stomatitis virus by photosensitization following incubation with a pyrene-fatty acid. Febs. Let. 270(12):9-10, 1990.
15. Boddie RL and Nickerson SE. Evaluation of postmilking teat germicides containing Lauricidin, saturated fatty acids, and lactic acid. J. Dairy Sci. 75(6):1725-30, 1992.
16. Ascherio A., Munger K.L., Lenette E.T., Spiegelman D., Hernan M.A., Olek M.J., Hankinson S.E., and Hunter, D.J. Epstein-Barr virus antibodies and risk of multiple sclerosis: a prospective study. JAMA 286(24:3127-9, Dec. 26th, 2001.
17. Simmons A. Herpes virus and multiple sclerosis. Herpes 8(3):60-3, Nov. 2001.

*Disclaimer: These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.