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Monolaurin

Monolaurin
Monolaurin
Item #: 4681

Size: 90 Capsules
This product is discontinued and is no longer available.


Monolaurin, 90 caps
for Immune System Support
  • Supports a Healthy Immune System
  • Extensive Laboratory Studies
  • Not Recommended as a Substitute for the Flu Vaccine
  • Good for 1 Time & Long-Term Preventative Use

Monolaurin is a glyceride ester derivative of lauric acid, a fatty acid found naturally in breast milk and certain vegetable oils. This fatty acid has been used as a germicidal agent for centuries. Lauric acid was originally discovered when microbiologists studied human breast milk to determine the antiviral substances which protected infants from microbial infections. In laboratory studies, it has been shown to have even greater viral activity than lauric acid and as a dietary supplement, Monolaurin has shown exciting results as an anti-viral and anti-bacterial agent.

In laboratory studies, Monolaurin was shown to work by destroying lipid-coated viruses such as herpes, cytomegalovirus, influenza, and various pathogenic bacteria and protozoa. By binding to the lipid-protein envelope of the virus, Monolaurin helps prevent viruses from attaching and entering host cells, making infection and replication impossible. Other laboratory studies show that Monolaurin disintegrates the viral envelope, killing the virus.

In studies performed at the Respiratory Virology Branch, Centers for Disease Control, Atlanta, Georgia, Monolaurin was found effective against 14 human RNA and DNA enveloped viruses in cell culture (3). These included influenza, RSV, Rubeola, Newcastle's, Coronavirus, Herpes Simplex types 1 & 2, Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) and cytomegalovirus. (Monolaurin has no effect on naked viruses, such as polio, encephalitis virus, coxsachie, or pox viruses.) Monolaurin removed all measurable infectivity by disintegrating the virus envelope. In addition to its antiviral effects, monolaurin has also been shown to have antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus agalactiae, Groups A, F & G streptococci, Chlamydia, H. pylori, and against yeast and fungi as well, including Candida and ringworm.

Monolaurin serves as a valuable nutritional adjunct for people who feel that they are coming down with a cold or flu. Many physicians have developed their own clinical protocols in their cold and flu prevention program and recommend taking several capsules of Monolaurin on an empty stomach. Monolaurin is not the type of nutritional supplement you have to take on a daily basis (although many people take it regularly for prevention purposes), but only when the need arises. If you have a fever or swollen lymph glands, it is always best to see a physician, but if you sense the early warning signs of the flu, like sniffles, sore skin and perhaps a scratchy throat, Monolaurin may offer the first line of defense.

Antibiotics kill unwanted micro-organisms, but they also kill many friendly micro-organisms. Monolaurin, on the other hand, does not appear to have an adverse effect on desirable digestive bacteria, but rather only on unwanted microorganisms. In addition Monolaurin can reduce the resistance of germs to antibiotics. Frequent antibiotic use can lead to major disruptions in health and especially immune system function. Antibiotic resistance, resulting from the over-use of prescription drugs, is one of the biggest problems facing the medical community today. Resistance is cumulative (and comes in part from antibiotics in our food supply). That's why it's important to consider starting with nutritional agents, such as Monolaurin.

Not only is Monolaurin included on the GRAS (Generally Recognized As Safe) list, but it may, by virtue of its source of origin, be safer than many other food supplements that are designed to boost the immune system.

Suggested Use:
Take 1-2 capsules with meals or as directed by a physician. For those who feel as if they are coming down with a viral infection, research suggests taking 6 capsules on an empty stomach, first thing in the morning and for more severe cases, 6 more at night. For those with a sensitive stomach, Monolaurin can be taken with food. The dose can be tapered off as symptoms decrease. Of course, you should always seek the advice of a physician if you have fever, pain or if symptoms persist.

Supplement Facts:
Serving Size 1 cap;
90 servings per container
Amount Per
Serving
% Daily
Value
Monolaurin 600 mg *
Inosine 7.5 mg *
Other Ingredients: Gelatin, Magnesium Stearate

Monolaurin References
1. Isaacs CE. The antimicrobial function of milk lipids. Adv. Nutr. Res. 10:271-85, 2001.
2. Welsh JK, May JT. Anti-infective properties of breast milk. J. Pediatrics 94, 1-9, 1979.
3. Hierholzer JC and Kabara JJ. In vitro effects of Monolaurin compounds on enveloped RNA and DNA viruses. J. Food Safety 4:1, 1982.
4. Kabara JJ. Lipids as host-resistance factors of human milk. Nutr. Rev. 38:65, 1980.
5. Silver RK et al. Factors in human milk interfering with influenza-virus activities. Science 123:932-933, 1956.
6. Cohen SS. Strategy for the chemotherapy of infectious diseases. Science 197:431, 1977.
7. Dulbecco A. Interference with viral multi- plication. In: Virology, Dulbecco, A. and Ginsberg, H. edit, Harper & Row, Philadelphia, 1980.
8. Kabara JJ et al. Fatty acids and derivatives as antimicrobial agents. Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 2:23, 1972.
9. Sands JA et al. Antiviral effects of fatty acids and derivatives. In: Pharmacological Effects of Lipids. Am. Oil Chem. Soc: Champaign, 1979;75.
10. Beuchat LA. Comparison of antiviral activities of potassium sorbate, sodium benzoate and glycerol and sucrose esters of fatty acids. Appi. Environ. Microbiol. 39:1178, 1980.
11. Sands J et al. Extreme sensitivity of enveloped viruses, including herpes simplex, to long chain unsaturated monoglycerides and alcohols. Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy 15(1):67-73, 1979.
12. Kohn A. et al. Unsaturated free fatty acids inactivated animal envelope viruses. Arch. Virol. 66:301-306, 1980.
13. Ismail-Cassim, N et al. Inhibition of the uncoating of bovine enterovirus by short chain fatty acids. J. Gen. Virol. 71(10):2283-9, 1990.
14. Rabia S. et al. Inactivation of vesicular stomatitis virus by photosensitization following incubation with a pyrene-fatty acid. Febs. Let. 270(12):9-10, 1990.
15. Boddie RL and Nickerson SE. Evaluation of postmilking teat germicides containing Lauricidin, saturated fatty acids, and lactic acid. J. Dairy Sci. 75(6):1725-30, 1992.
16. Ascherio A., Munger K.L., Lenette E.T., Spiegelman D., Hernan M.A., Olek M.J., Hankinson S.E., and Hunter, D.J. Epstein-Barr virus antibodies and risk of multiple sclerosis: a prospective study. JAMA 286(24:3127-9, Dec. 26th, 2001.
17. Simmons A. Herpes virus and multiple sclerosis. Herpes 8(3):60-3, Nov. 2001.

*Disclaimer: These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.